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FBI Continues Charges Towards North Korea

Theories follow one another around the origin of the attack on Sony Pictures which led to the recovery by hackers of thousands of files and personal data, with the outcome that we currently know: sharing of unexploited films, the communication of emails deemed sensitive, the publication of personal data of employees …

FBI Quickly, the pirate collective behind the attack had organized a blackmail: Sony had to give up publishing and exploiting the film "the interview that kills", a film in which CIA agents organize a false interview of leader Kim Jong-Un in order to assassinate him.

After an initial investigation, the FBI had come to conclude Pyongyang's involvement in the hacking: "Following our investigation, and in close collaboration with other agencies and bodies of the American government, the FBI now has enough information to conclude that the North Korean government is responsible for these actions. "

Despite everything, various other observers have put forward different theories, notably that of ex-Sony employees wishing to harm their ex-employer. It is moreover a more than plausible thesis, since a person in charge of the computer network would have had all the leisure to organize the collection of sensitive data allowing him to simplify the work of the hackers, in particular by indicating to them in which servers to go to pick up the data as quickly as possible.

According to Norse, this idea makes a lot of sense, and the company would have followed a trail to evoke the involvement of at least six people in the organization of the hacking, including one internal to Sony.

The FBI, which received the Norse company for more than three hours to study the highlighted track, however did not back down on its own statements. The federal office has judged the evidence advanced as "weak", and decides to maintain its accusations against North Korea, without succeeding for the moment in clearly demonstrating the latter.